Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math

High‐tech jobs are the future of our economy. It is imperative for students to gain hands‐on education to become the work‐force of tomorrow. While the need for the next generation of scientists, engineers and mathematicians in the United States is growing, student enrollment in STEM‐related studies has decreased by 20 percent since 2000. The success of our nation is driven by creativity and innovation, which is developed through an enthusiasm for science, technology, engineering and math.

STEM Highlights


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    DPS Office of School Nutrition | $10,000

    The school garden program, facilitated by the Office of School Nutrition, is an opportunity for focused learning related to the concepts associated with plant science. Students have the responsibility to plan, plot, plant, and preserve the components of their gardens. They are introduced to technologies in horticulture and agriculture, engineering applied to irrigation, artistic concepts of beds, mathematical, writing, and life style activities. Elementary, middle, and high school students have been impacted by the school gardens. The goal is to establish school gardens throughout the district in support of healthy school food and academic achievement. Advanced students’ leadership and gardening skills with a 6-month training and peer education program.

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    George Washington Carver STEM Academy | $10,000

    Seven teachers and 47 students in grades pre-K through 8, participated in the C-STEM challenge and teacher institute. The goal of the Challenge and Institute is to reduce the achievement gaps in areas of communication, science, technology, engineering, and mathematics through focused teacher training, experiential learning, and exposure to careers in related C-STEM fields. Accelerated student project based learning through the purchase of chemistry, biology and botany supplies.

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    DPS - Go Green Challenge | $11,000

    Twenty DPS teachers successfully competed to be recipients of the BOSCH Energy, Science, and Technology (BEST) teacher grant program. Each teacher received an award of $500 which was used to implement classroom projects in recycling, sustainability, and other “green” initiatives. Encouraged environmental inquiry and invention through the Go Green Challenge where students developed and implemented projects ranging from greenhouses to solar pizza ovens.

2014/15 Grants


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    SAE Foundation | $30,000

    Encouraged 1,300 K-3rd grade students to engage in science through hands-on lessons through the “A World In Motion” program.

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    Ben Carson High for Science and Medicine School | $23,250

    Implemented the Linked Learning Program by supporting teacher professional development and materials for student learning activities.

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    DPS Office of College and Career Readiness | $20,000

    Supported educational opportunities between Ben Carson School of Science and Medicine and Wayne County Community College through the purchase of collegiate level textbooks.

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    Ben Carson High School for Science and Medicine | $17, 587

    For general program support.

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    Engineering Society of Detroit | $13,200

    Progressed students’ cross-cultural experiences and team work as well as problem solving, public speaking, and STEM skills.

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    DPS Office of Science | $6,024

    Supported science teacher professional development through the Illuminate DPS/Camp Invention program.

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    DPS Office of Military Science | $5,000

    Used underwater robotics to enhance students understanding of math, engineering, physics, team work, and computer programming.

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    Detroit Public Schools | $4,800

    Public exhibition of student resources located within the Detroit Children’s Museum.

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    Schulze Academy | $3,125

    Developed student information technology skills by supporting equipment needs for an after-school computer club.

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    Keidan Special Education Center | $3,000

    Created a generational teaching and learning environment around school based gardens.

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    Detroit Public Schools | $2,800

    Students applied their new knowledge of solar power and engineering with a Solar Detroit Student Design contest.

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    DPS Office of Superintendent | $500

    Bolstered professional development of DPS administrators in STEM programs for youth.